Compensation Options for Ill and Injured Reservists

exclamation circle icon It is important to note that Reservists cannot receive compensation through more than one program at the same time. Reservists should carefully examine which option will be the most advantageous for them depending on their specific situation. Regardless of which option is chosen, all work-related injuries or illnesses must be reported to the Director Casualty Support Management using form CF 98 – “Report of Injuries, Disease or Illness”, and hazardous incidents must be reported to the Director General Safety using form DND 663 – “Hazardous Occurrence Report”.

When Reservists experience an injury or illness attributable to military service, they are eligible to apply for compensation through the following benefits:

  1. Extension of Class “C” Service for personnel whose injury or illness was sustained on Special Duty Service;
  2. Reserve Force – Compensation During a Period of Injury, Disease or Illness (Reserve Force Compensation); or
  3. Compensation pursuant to the Government Employees Compensation Act.

1. Extension of Class "C" Reserve service for personnel whose injury or illness was sustained on Special Duty Service

What is it?

What is it?

A member is considered on Class “C” on Special Duty Service when he or she is serving, training or traveling in a Special Duty Area or as part of Special Duty Operation.  The Minister of National Defence may designate such areas or operations where members are or may be exposed to conditions of elevated risk.1

If a Reservist is injured while on Class “C” on Special Duty Service2 that has not yet expired, an extension of Class “C” service may be authorized. It is the home unit Commanding Officer’s responsibility to advice Director Causality Support Management of the requirement to extend the period of Class C service and the required length of the extension. Under this extension, the Reservist is considered entitled to pay and continued medical care provided by the Canadian Armed Forces pursuant to the Spectrum of Care.  For more information regarding medical care entitlements for Class “C” Reservists, review Health Care for Reservists

For details on eligibility, please consult Extension of Class C Reserve Service for a personnel whose injury or illness was sustained on Special Duty Service (SDS). Additionally, you can review the Compensation and Benefits Instruction Chapter 210.72 (13) – “Reserve Force – Compensation During a Period of Injury, Disease or Illness” and CANFORGEN 174/07 – “Extension of Class C Reserve Service for Personnel Whose Injury or Illness was Sustained on Special Duty Service.”*

If a Reservist was injured or became ill while on Class “C” on Special Duty Service, but the injury or illness was not diagnosed before the termination of the Class “C” period of service, the member may be eligible for Reserve Force Compensation or benefits under the Government Employees Compensation Act. The Reservist would remain eligible for Canadian Armed Forces care only for their service-related injury.


  1. CANFORGEN 089/03 – “Special Duty Areas (SDA)/Special Duty Operations (SDO)”.
  2. CANFORGEN 174/07 – “Extension of Class C Reserve Service for Personnel Whose Injury or Illness was Sustained on Special Duty Service” defines Special Duty Service as service in a special duty area (SDA) or as part of a special duty operation (SDO); training for the express purpose of service in a SDA or as part of a SDO; travel to and from a SDA or SDO or the location of the training; and authorized leave during special duty service.
  • *Some of the directives cited in this document are available only on the Defence Information Network. If you do not have access to the internal network, you can contact our Office at phone icon1-888-828-3626 to obtain the information.

How to apply

How to apply

It is important to remember that the injury or illness being reported in this case must have occurred while on Class “C” on Special Duty Service. The required documents must also be completed and submitted before the end of the Class “C” on Special Duty Service.

When applying for an extension of Class “C” service for personnel whose illness or injury was sustained on Special Duty Service, the following process must be followed:

  • The member reports the service-related injury or illness sustained on the Class “C” on Special Duty Service to the employing chain of command; 
  • The commanding officer and the member complete form CF 98 and forward it to the Director Casualty Support Management within 14 days (Note: since November 2017, the form can be submitted with electronic signatures); 
  • The chain of command also completes form DND 663 to report a hazardous occurrence to the Director General Safety;
  • The employing unit must also notify the commanding officer of the member’s home unit of the injury or illness;  
  • The employing chain of command, the member, and a medical doctor complete form DND 2346 – “Application for extension of Class “C” Reserve Service for personnel whose injury or illness was sustained on Special Duty Service”; 
  • The employing unit forwards a cover letter and recommendation, as well as form DND 2346 to the Director Casualty Support Management; and
  • The Director Casualty Support Management reviews and adjudicates the request for an extension of Class “C” Special Duty Service. The decision is then sent to the member’s employing unit

The application process can also be reviewed in our investigative report A Systemic Review of Compensation Options for Ill and Injured Reservists. (Appendix C).

exclamation circle icon If a Reservist is injured on a period of Class “C” service that is not considered Special Duty Service, he or she may be eligible for benefits through Reserve Force Compensation or the Government Employees Compensation Act.

2. Reserve Force Compensation

What is it?

What is it?

When Reservists on Class “A”, “B” or “C” Reserve Service suffers an illness, disease, or injury attributable to military service, which continues beyond the period of service during which it occurred, they may be eligible Reserve Force Compensation.  This provides:

  • The Reserve Force Compensation benefit is an amount that is equivalent to the rate of pay established at the member's rank for their class of Reserve Service at the time of injury or illness); and
  • Although not part of the Reserve Force Compensation benefit, the Canadian Armed Forces provide healthcare to Reservists who suffer from a service-related illness or injury. 

Compensation can continue at the discretion of the Minister, but cannot extend beyond:

  • The date of release, or
  • The date on which treatment for the injury, disease, or illness is completed.  Treatment is considered completed when the competent medical authority determines that member is able to resume active participation in the Reserve Force, resume full-time post-secondary studies, resume the occupation held at the time of injury, illness or disease, or to seek civilian employment, whichever occurs first.

stacked info icon For more information on Reserve Force Compensation, please consult Compensation and Benefits Instruction Chapter 210.72 – “Reserve Force – Compensation During a Period of Injury, Disease or Illness”.

3. The Government Employees Compensation Act

What is it?

What is it?

The Government Employees Compensation Act provides compensation to employees of the federal government, including Reservists,3 who have sustained a work-related injury or illness. This legislation delegates authority to each provincial/territorial workers’ compensation board to manage compensation on behalf of the federal government. The benefits available under the Government Employees Compensation Act may cover: 

  • Lost wages for civilian and military employment, up to a maximum amount which is determined by each province; and
  • Medical expenses associated with the work-related injury or illness only. 
2016 Key Benefits Information
JurisdictionMaximum Compensation EarningsPercentage of earnings benefits are based on
Alberta $98,700 90%
British Columbia $80,600 90%
Manitoba No Maximum 90%
New Brunswick $61,800 85%
Newfoundland and Labrador $62,540 80%
Northwest Territories and Nunavut $88,600 90%
Nova Scotia $58,200 75%
(85% after 26 weeks)
Ontario $88,000 85%
Prince Edward Island $52,200 85%
Quebec $71,500 90%
Saskatchewan $69,242 90%
Yukon $84,837 75%

 


  1. Section 3(1) of the Government Employees Compensation Act indicates that the Act does not apply to any person who is a member of the Regular Force of the Canadian Armed Forces; however, Reservists of all classes are eligible.
How to apply

How to apply

When applying for compensation through the Government Employees Compensation Act, the following process must be followed: 

  • The member reports the work-related injury or illness to the chain of command;
  • The commanding officer and the member complete form CF 98 to report the injury or illness, and forward the form to the Director Casualty Support Management within 14 days (Note: since November 2017, the form can be submitted with electronic signatures;
  • The chain of command also completes form DND 663 to report a hazardous occurrence to the Director General Safety;
  • The member should verify that a claim under the Government Employees Compensation Act is more advantageous than a claim for Reserve Force Compensation;
  • The unit completes the appropriate Employer's Report of Injury or Disease form that corresponds to the province or territory in which the employee normally works (the home unit) and submits it to Employment and Social Development Canada. The relevant medical professional completes the appropriate provincial medical form and sends it to the provincial Workers’ Compensation Board;
  • Employment and Social Development Canada confirms eligibility of an applicant and, if eligible, sends the claim to the appropriate provincial Workers’ Compensation Board; and
  • The provincial or territorial Workers’ Compensation Board then adjudicates and manages the claim according to its provincial legislation. 

The application process can also be reviewed in our investigative report A Systemic Review of Compensation Options for Ill and Injured Reservists. (Appendix G)

exclamation circle icon Important! If the member is injured outside of the province or territory where their home unit is located, the employing unit must use the provincial forms of the home unit province or territory.

Research Your Options!

Reserve Force Compensation or Government Employees Compensation Act?

Reserve Force Compensation or Government Employees Compensation Act?

The option that is right for you doesn’t depend on your rank or your salary. Whether you’re a Corporal or a Lieutenant, both options are available to you. Your decision will be based on your specific employment situation.   

If most of your income comes from civilian employment, you might want to consider a claim through the Government Employees Compensation Act. If you are working full-time for the Canadian Armed Forces, you may want to consider Reserve Force Compensation. 

Remember, these are just guidelines! If you’re having trouble deciding which option is best for your situation, seek assistance through your chain of command, Director Casualty Support Management or your provincial/territorial workers’ compensation board.

Let’s explore examples:

A Class “A” Reservist with a full-time civilian job may choose to claim under the Government Employees Compensation Act because he/she would get coverage for both the civilian income and the Reserve service income. If the same Reservist applied for compensation through Reserve Force Compensation, he/she would only be compensated for Class “A” service, which is usually a few days per month and would not receive compensation for their full-time civilian job. Reserve Force Compensation is paid for seven days a week, even if the member was on Class “A” at the time of injury.

A Reservist (Class “A” or “B”) with no civilian job might choose a claim through Reserve Force Compensation, which would cover 100 percent of their income for their Class “A” service. A claim under the Government Employees Compensation Act may also cover his/her military service income. However, depending on the province, this could be 75-90 percent of his/her wages.

Other Benefits

Which benefits am I entitled to as a Reservist with a service-related illness or injury?

Which benefits am I entitled to as a Reservist with a service-related illness or injury?

Members can find information and general guidance on additional benefits through the: Military Benefits Browser

In addition, Reservists with a service-related injury or illness may contact Veterans Affairs Canada for more information on entitlements to other possible compensation and benefits.

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